The Interlude Celebrates the Month of February

At the time of preparing for the website launch of the magazine last month, doubts started to seep into my mind about whether or not it was a good idea. To invest so much of my time into it and let the magazine take over my life- suffice to say, I was a little nervous and wanted to back out at the last minute. My depression at the time did not help either. All the other members- the writers, the editors, the artists, and the photographers, had already handed in their works in which they dedicated their free time, and if they’re anything like me, their sleepless nights as well. As the Editor-in-Chief, I couldn’t just turn my back on all the hard work put into it by such talented individuals who entrusted us with their time. So here we are after over a month of the launch, after over 50 published pieces on the website, standing proud- and a little exhausted, if I am being honest.

The exhaustion is, however, worth it. Over the course of February until now, we have featured articles about the celebration of world cancer day, the day of zero tolerance against female genital mutilation, and the effect of valentine’s day on mental health. There have also been articles about badminton and browser extensions, things I am familiar with but have very limited knowledge about, and a beautifully articulated review on a book about reclaiming identity. We have published various artworks, and the photography team made a collection of photos called Freedom, from various people, and I highly recommend checking that out. The pieces on All Too Well and the comparison article between the movies 500 Days of Summer and Amélie make me glad that I did not back out when I felt overwhelmed. The writers are mature and nuanced, polished gems waiting to be discovered by the world. We also featured an independent singer/songwriter that I myself got to know about only after reading the article sent in by a contributor, and his new song is, as my generation likes to say, clearly a bop. I am most proud of our Dear Friend project which you can find out more about on the widget areas of the website and on the menu.

Dear contributors, readers, and well-wishers, I know that it has not been long, but I feel the overwhelming need to convey my gratitude to you all who have shown even the teensiest bit of interest towards this platform I hold so dearly to my heart. The Interlude is my brainchild that I share with my co-founder, and our goal was to give people a platform to express themselves without the fear of rejection; the fear that holds us back, that creates an invisible wall in front of us, that tells us we aren’t good enough. We are always welcoming your work so don’t hesitate to send them to us, as well as any feedback you may have for us regarding our work or website. It’s all about building ourselves to be the better version so let’s do it together. Send your writing pieces, artworks, photographs to [email protected] and if you’re looking to be a member of our team, send us your CV! Follow our website and stay in touch with us because we have a lot more to share with you and work on ourselves in the process.

Contributor

  • Faeeja Humaira Meem

    Faeeja Humaira Meem, co-founder and editor-in-chief at The Interlude, is an aspiring author and a pro at procrastinating, often blogging about books, life, and everything in between. She is inspired by Samuel Johnson and likes to think she can juggle everything at once, but instead, she is constantly second-guessing her life decisions and avoiding phone calls like a plague.

Faeeja Humaira Meem

Faeeja Humaira Meem

Faeeja Humaira Meem, co-founder and editor-in-chief at The Interlude, is an aspiring author and a pro at procrastinating, often blogging about books, life, and everything in between. She is inspired by Samuel Johnson and likes to think she can juggle everything at once, but instead, she is constantly second-guessing her life decisions and avoiding phone calls like a plague.

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